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Occasionally I wandered in where I was not wanted and gave truthful answers.
Sometimes I even did it deliberately. A little disruption now can prevent disaster later.

A work in progress. Explaining words and phrases that I often use. Noting new and interesting ideas. Discussing certain verbal warning signs. There’s no social justice or political correctness here.

Offsite links open a new window. Underlined links are internal to the site.
Uppercase links go to the lexicon. Script links go to the timetable.
A dashed border and red banner means I don't agree with the defintion or that it is a dangerous idea.

Ll…

Today's secret word is
Lá an Dreoilín       Lady Day       Lady in the Court of Shadows       Lady in the Court of Stars       the Lament       Lammas       Lammastide       language       language game       Law of Association       Law of Cause & Effect       Law of Contagion       Law of Dynamic Balance       Law of Evocation       Law of Finite Senses       Law of Identification       Law of Infinite Data       Law of Infinite Universes       Law of Invocation       Law of Knowledge       Law of Names       Law of Negative Attraction       Law of Personal Universes       Law of Personification       Law of Perversity       Law of Polarity       Law of Positive Attraction       Law of Pragmatism       Law of Self-Knowledge       Law of Similarity       Law of Synchronicity       Law of Synthesis       Law of True Falsehoods       Law of Words of Power       Law of Unity       lawfare       legacy media       Lesser Sabbat       liberty       liberty argument       liberty blue       lineage       Litha       live & let live works mostly       living faith       logos       loincloth       long term working       love       ludus       Lughnasadh       Lughomass       Lupercus       Lysenkoism            
a b c d e f g h i j k Ll…   m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

Lá an Dreoilín or The Hunting of the Wrens      26December

Lady Day     See Ostara, vernal equinox

Lady in the Court of Shadows

A three day WebTree celebration marking the dark Moon from midnight the day before the "new Moon" to midnight the day after and honoring the magick.


Lady in the Court of Stars

A three day WebTree celebration marking the bright Moon from midnight the day before the "full Moon" to midnight the day after and honoring the magick.


The name reflects the journey of the moon and pays homage to one of the oldest known myths, Inanna's Descent to the Underworld. She reigned in her own court, but as Inanna journeyed through the gates of the underworld, She had to leave Her raiment, Her jewels, and Her holy tools. Everything that symbolized and manifested Her power had to be left behind, until finally nude, Inanna entered the underworld unbound by anything.

In this version, the Lady can't enter and reign in one Court until after sacrificing everything of the other Court including all manifestations of power. She's barred from one Court as long as She holds anything from the other Court. While the Lady comes into other power and may be supreme in that moment, She will have to leave for the other Court and repeat the cycle. The Lady can't achieve power without sacrificing everything She was, and She can't hold power permanently.

The Lady reigns by virtue of Her presence in the Court.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#court-of-shadows
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#court-of-stars

the Lament

Starts on the passing day and lasts for thirteen days and nights. I stop doing anything unnecessary. I may hit the grocery store before beginning the Lament. I cut back my internet and stop watching TV or listening to music. I cut my reading way way back.

I invented it when a friend passed, and refined it with my stepfather’s passing.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#lament

Lammas      around 07August

Traditional neopagan sabbat. Cross quarter day, Greater Sabbat, High Holiday, & fire festival. Lammas marks the midpoint between the summer solstice and the autumnal equinox and the beginning of fall. First of the trilogy of harvest festivals. “Tailltean marriages” of a year and a day often began. Craft festivals and prosperity magick occured. The Christian First Fruits celebration was observed by placing bread baked from first harvest on the altar.
This date has long been considered a “power point” of the zodiac, and is symbolized by the Lion, one of the tetramorph figures found on the tarot cards, the World and the Wheel of Fortune (the other three figures being the Bull, the Eagle, and the Spirit). Astrologers know these four figures as the symbols of the four “fixed” signs of the zodiac, and these naturally align with the four Great Sabbats of Witchcraft. Christians have adopted the same iconography to represent the four Gospel writers.

“Lammas” was the medieval Christian name for the holiday, and it means “loaf-mass”, for this was the day on which loaves of bread were baked from the first grain harvest and laid on the church altars as offerings. It was a day representative of “first fruits” and early harvest.

In Irish Gaelic, the feast was referred to as “Lughnasadh”, a feast to commemorate the funeral games of the Irish Sun God Lugh. However, there is some confusion on this point. Although at first glance, it may seem that we are celebrating the death of Lugh, the God of Light does not really die (mythically) until the autumnal equinox. And indeed, if we read the Irish myths closer, we discover that it is not Lugh’s death that is being celebrated, but the funeral games that Lugh hosted to commemorate the death of his foster mother, Taillte. That is why the Lughnasadh celebrations in Ireland are often called the “Tailltean games”.

One common feature of the games was the “Tailltean marriages”, a rather informal marriage that lasted for only a year-and-a-day or until next Lammas. At that time, the couple could decide to continue the arrangement if it pleased them, or to stand back to back and walk away from one another, thus bringing the Tailltean marriage to a formal close. Such trial marriages (obviously related to the Wiccan handfasting) were quite common even into the 1500s, although it was something one “didn’t bother the parish priest about”. Indeed, such ceremonies were usually solemnized by a poet, bard, or shanachie (or, it may be guessed, by a priest or priestess of the Old Religion).

Lammastide was also the traditional time of year for craft festivals. The medieval guilds would create elaborate displays of their wares, decorating their shops and themselves in bright colors and ribbons, marching in parades, and performing strange, ceremonial plays and dances for the entranced onlookers. The atmosphere must have been quite similar to our modern-day Renaissance festivals.

The time of the Lammas harvest marks the end of the growing season and if successful, is blessed by overflowing baskets of summer vegetables and fruit; setting into motion what will hopefully be the standard for the remaining gatherings. Grains are in abundance and at their peak, the sheaves of golds and browns awaiting the scythe of reaping. The tempting aromas of freshly baked bread and fruit pies call us in from field and orchard. And, as we gather this abundance to ourselves and our loved ones, the great sacrifice of all that is left behind or cut too early is transparent to us.

This cutting down of what is ready for the taking offers us the opportunity to clear the way for those things that will be newly planted after the frost of winter holds their seeds in slumber. This time of the harvest allows us to feast on what will nourish and sustain us in the darkened months ahead. This harvest offers us choice to carefully select only those products that have reached the peak fullness of their energy as we cut away what stands in our path. However, none of this can be achieved without the necessary sacrifice of what no longer serves and will decay and wither if left to stand. And, it is this point of sacrifice that is celebrated and honored in the Great Wheel of our own cycle.

In the cycle of the God and Goddess Lammas also represents the union of the sun and earth in their forms as the Sun God Lugh and the Mother Grain Goddess. It is the sun that has enlivened the earth and brought the fullness of their union to be harvested. And, now that his solar energy is waning, the God must also serve as the willing sacrifice transformed as the sheaf of wheat to be cut down and offered by the Harvest Mother so none will go hungry. This aspect of sacrifice is honored in the gathering of oats, wheat and barley. The baking of the traditional Bread Man from the dough of the newly cut wheat is a way of consuming the energy of the harvest, gifted by the living spirit of the God now transformed into the harvested grain. The cycle of death and renewal is acknowledged by the seeds that remain from what was harvested and will be used to plant anew in the Spring. And, we become the living essence of sun and earth, God and Goddess.
Lammas: The Sacrificial Harvest

See also Harvestpoint, Harvestpoint, Harvestpoint, Lughnasadh, Cornucopia, Lammastide, Lughomass, Thingtide, First Fruits, First Harvest, Grain Harvest

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#lammas

language

The language we use and the rules we choose shape our thought.

Experience trumps language every time. Tell someone who has never heard music what Greensleeves is. Tell someone who knows nothing about fruit how amazing homemade peach ice cream is in the summer. Tell a virgin how incredible sex can be with someone you care about.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#language

language game

You can't play the language game with a revealed faith system, they always answer to a Higher Truth™. At least in their own minds. They're the ones who use language to control which thoughts are allowed under which circumstances.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#language-game

The Law of Association      “Commonality controls.”

If any two or more patterns have elements in common, the patterns interact “through” those common elements, and control of one pattern facilitates control over the other(s), depending (among other factors) upon the number, type and duration of common elements involved.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#association

The Law of Cause & Effect
     “Control every variable and you control every change — lotsa luck!”

If exactly the same actions are done under exactly the same conditions, they will usually be associated with exactly the same “results;” similar strings of events produce similar outcomes.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#cause-effect

The Law of Contagion      “Magic is contagious.”

Objects or beings in physical or psychic contact with each other continue to interact after separation.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#contagion

The Law of Dynamic Balance      “Dance to the music.”

To survive, let alone to become powerful, one must keep every aspect of one’s universe(s) in a state of dynamic balance with every other one; extremism is dangerous on both the personal and the evolutionary levels of reality.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#dynamic-balance

The Law of Evocation      “…Beings without.”

It is possible to establish external communication with entities from either inside or outside of oneself, said entities seeming to be outside of oneself during the communication process.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#evocation

The Law of Finite Senses
     “Just cause it’s invisible don’t mean it ain’t there.”

Every sense mechanism of every entity is limited by both range and type of data perceived.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#finite-senses

The Law of Identification      “You can become another.”

It is possible through maximum association between the elements of oneself and those of another being to actually become that being to the point of sharing its knowledge and weilding its power.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#identification

The Law of Infinite Data      “There’s always something new”

The number of phenomena to be known is infinite; one will never run out of things to learn.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#infinite-data

The Law of Infinite Universes
     “All things are possible, though some are more probable than others.”

The total number of universes into which all possible combinations of existing phenomena could be organized is infinite.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#infinite-universes

The Law of Invocation     “Beings within…”

It is possible to establish internal communication with entities from either inside or outside of oneself, said entities seeming to be inside of oneself during the communication process.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#invocation

The Law of Knowledge      “Knowledge is power.”

Understanding brings control; the more that is known about a subject, the easier it is to exercise control over it.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#knowledge

The Law of Names      “What’s in a name? — Everything!”

Knowing the complete and true name of an object, being or process gives one complete control over it.
<adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#names

The Law of Negative Attraction      “Opposites attract.”

Like attracts unlike; energy and actions often attract their “opposites.”

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#negative-attraction

The Law of Personal Universes
     “You live in your cosmos and I’ll live in mine.”

Every sentient being lives in and quite possibly creates a unique universe which can never be 100% identical to that lived in by another.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#personal-universes

The Law of Personification      “Anything can be a person.”

Any phenomenon may be considered to be alive and to have a personality, that is, to “be” an entity or being, and may be effectively dealt with thusly.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#personification

The Law of Perversity      “If anything can go wrong, it will.”

If anything can go wrong, it will — and in the most annoying manner possible.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,  Murphy’s Law, Finagle’s Constant, Finagle’s Law, Finagle's Law of Dynamic Negatives, Finagle’s Corollary to Murphy’s Law, Melody's Law,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#perversity

The Law of Polarity      “Everything contains its opposite.”

Any pattern of data can be split into (at least) two patterns with “opposing” characteristics, and each will contain the essence of the other within itself.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#polarity

The Law of Positive Attraction
     “That which is sent, returns.”

Like attracts like; to create a particular reality you must put out energy of a similar sort.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#positive-attraction

The Law of Pragmatism      “If it works, it’s true.”

If a pattern of belief or behavior enables a being to survive and to accomplish chosen goals, than that belief or behavior is “true” or “real” or “sensible” on whatever levels of reality are involved.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#pragmatism

The Law of Self-Knowledge      “Know thyself.”

The most important kind of magical knowledge is about oneself; familiarity with one’s own strengths and weaknesses is vital to success as a magician.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#self-knowledge

The Law of Similarity      “Look-alikes are alike.”

Effects are liable to have an outward physical or mental “appearance” similar to their causes.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#similarity

The Law of Synchronicity
     “Coincidence is seldom mere.”

Two or more events happening at the same time are likely to have more associations in common than the merely temporal; very few events ever really happen in isolation from nearby events.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#synchronicity

The Law of Synthesis      “Synthesis reconciles.”

The synthesis of two or more “opposing” patterns of data will produce a new pattern that will be “truer” than either of the first ones were, that is, it will be applicable to more realities (or “levels of reality”).
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#synthesis

The Law of True Falsehoods
     “If it’s a paradox it’s probably true.”

It’s possible for a concept or act to violate the truth patterns of a given universe (including an individual’s or group’s part of a consensus reality) and yet to still be “true,” provided that it “works” in a specific context.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#true-falsehoods

The Law of Words of Power
     “A word to the wise is sufficient.”

There exist certain words that are able to alter the internal and external realities of those uttering them, and their power may rest in the very sounds of the words as much as in their meanings.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#words-power

The Law of Unity      “All is One.”

Every phenomenon in existence is linked directly or indirectly to every other one, past, present or future; perceived separations between phenomena are based on incomplete sensing and/or thinking.
adapted from Isaac Bonewits' The Laws of Magic

first published in “The Laws of Magic”, Real Magic

See also Laws of Magic,
Study guide - Bonewits' Laws of Magic

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#unity

lawfare

Lawfare is a form of asymmetric warfare, consisting of using the legal system against an enemy, such as by damaging or delegitimizing them, tying up their time or winning a public relations victory. The term is a portmanteau of the words law and warfare.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#lawfare

legacy media

"Legacy media" is politi-speak that political conservatives use to identify long-standing ("mature") media outlets (such as the TV news networks - ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, etc., and the major print news services - New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times., etc.) Typically, these ostensibly "left-wing" news outlets are critical of conservative political agendas. Why the conservative wordsmiths use "legacy media" instead of "liberal media" is a mystery. Perhaps they feel that the term "liberal media" has been kicked around too long and needs replacement.

From what I've seen, the “legacy media” moves beyond anti-conservative bias. It's active hostility towards conservative ideas and visible conservatives, particularly successful and happy conservatives.

“Share the pain” and “feel the pain” seem to be guiding principles. Passions trump logic. Measurable results are about appearances, not solving the problem. Government programs must replace private solutions. The institution is more important than the people. These are “legacy media” assumptions.

If libertarians are mentioned at all, it's usually as “conservative light.”

The “legacy media” avoids discussing the merits of unapproved conservative ideas and instead tries to disparage or shame conservatives.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#legacy-media

Lesser Sabbat

The Lesser Sabbats were the two solstices at midsummer and midwinter, and the two equinoxes in spring and autumn. These may vary by a day or two each year, as they depend upon the sun’s apparent entry into the zodiacal signs of Capricorn (winter solstice), Cancer (summer solstice), Aries (spring equinox) and Libra (autumn equinox). These occasions also were celebrated as festivals by the Druids.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#lesser-sabbat

liberty

Do what you want as long as you don't interfere with others.

That means recognizing & respecting other people. It's not a right unless the other has it too.

All men are naturally in a state of perfect freedom to order their actions, and dispose of their possessions and persons as they think fit, within the bounds of the law of Nature, without asking leave or depending upon the will of any other man.
— John Locke

Rightful liberty is unobstructed action according to our will within limits drawn around us by the equal rights of others. I do not add “within the limits of the law” because law is often but the tyrant’s will, and always so when it violates the rights of the individual.
— Thomas Jefferson

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law. Love is the law, love under will.
➢ Aleister Crowley, law of Thelema

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#liberty

liberty argument     See generalized argument

liberty blue       #66CCFF  

My second favorite web color.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#blue

Litha      summer solstice

Traditional neopagan sabbat. Quarter day, Lesser Sabbat, Low Holiday, & solar festival. The longest day and the sun's greatest strengh. Litha marks the summer solstice and the middle of summer.
Midsummer or the Summer Solstice is the most powerful day of the year for the Sun God. Because this Sabbat glorifies the Sun God and the Sun, fire plays a very prominent role in this festival. The element of Fire is the most easily seen and immediately felt element of transformation. It can burn, consume, cook, shed light or purify and balefires still figure prominently at modern Midsummer rites.

Most cultures of the Northern Hemisphere mark Midsummer in some ritualised manner and from time immemorial people have acknowledged the rising of the sun on this day. At Stonehenge, the heelstone marks the midsummer sunrise as seen from the centre of the stone circle.

In ancient times, the Summer Solstice was a fire-festival of great importance when the burning of balefires ritually strengthened the sun. It was often marked with torchlight processions, by flaming tar barrels or by wheels bound with straw, which were set alight and rolled down steep hillsides. The Norse especially loved lengthy processions and would gather together their animals, families and lighted torches and parade through the countryside to the celebration site.

The use of fires, as well as providing magical aid to the sun, were also used to drive out evil and to bring fertility and prosperity to men, crops and herds. Blazing gorse or furze was carried around cattle to prevent disease and misfortune; while people would dance around the balefires or leap through the flames as a purifying or strengthening rite. The Celts would light balefires all over their lands from sunset the night before Midsummer until sunset the next day. Around these flames the festivities would take place.

Litha is the season of expansion, when the crops burgeon forth. We forget winters cares and spend our days basking under the brilliant light. The Summer Solstice brings us the longest day of the year – the zenith of the Sun King, and also His death as the Holly King dethrones him and takes reign over the now waning year. From now until Yule, the light will fade into darkness.

This is the time of lovers and gardeners. The rutting fervor of Beltane has deepened into the passionate eroticism that grows when partners become familiar with one another rhythms and moods. It is the love between those committed by heart as well as body. It is also the love of parents for their children (be they two- or four-legged!). Everywhere we look, ripeness spills out from field and forest.

Litha is the height of the Divine Marriage, then the Oak King falls, His vigor and prime giving way to the sagacity of the Holly King, even as the Goddess prepares Herself for harvest and Cronehood.
Litha The Summer Solstice

See also solstice, Suncrest, Suncrest, Suncrest, solstice, Feill-Sheathain, Jani, Alban Hefin, Juhannus, Midsommarafton, Saint John's Eve

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#litha

lineage     See kin

live & let live works mostly

One of my common sayings. The best way I know to save your passion for the really important things.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#live-and-let-live

living faith

A living faith draws from three sources.

  • There's what others have done before you.
  • There's who you are and what you've done.
  • And finally there's the link you make to the Divine.
The dynamic balance between these three things drive and shape your faith.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#living-faith

logos

  1. philosophy. the rational principle that governs and develops the universe.
  2. the divine word or reason incarnate in Jesus Christ. John 1:1–14.
  3. The logical appeal, often uses facts and figures.
    Research inspired by an entry at Chas
    Clifton's Letter from Hardscrabble Creek

    See also ethos, pathos, rhetoric, ethos, pathos, rhetoric, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modes_of_persuasion

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#logos

loincloth

A loincloth is a species of culotte of primitive origin whose name derives from the Latin lumbus, meaning the pelvic region. It consists of a waistband and a flap of cloth which hangs in front of the pubic region. Strictly speaking, the cloth does not pass through the crotch; if it did the culotte would be a g-string, not a loincloth. Still worn by millions of people daily, often topless, and including both men and women, the loincloth is a dress staple on the planet.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#loincloth

long term working

A set of rituals that takes place over several days at least.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#long-term-working

love

A strong affection for another. One sign that it might be healthy is if it is mutual.

I use the Greek words for love.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#love

ludus

In ancient Roman culture, the Latin word ludus (plural ludi) has several meanings within the semantic field of "play, game, sport, training"

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#ludus

Lupercus     See Imbolc

Lysenkoism

Originally in the USSR, a political campaign conducted by Trofim Lysenko and the Soviet authorities against genetics and science based agriculture techniques. Today it means distorting the scientific process to advance a political goal, usually flawed.

  index  
http://www.neowayland.com/lexicon/ll/#lysenkoism

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